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in afghanistan and pakistan. not later than 120 days after enactment of this act, the entity described in subsection 8, shall submit to the president and the congress, a report. sense of congress, it is the sense of congress that the entity should be modeled on the iraq study group. section 8127, not more than $200 million may be expended -- the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise. mr. carter: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 31 printed in the congressional record offered by mr. carter of texas. strike lines 6 through 9 relating to military musical units. the chair: the gentleman from texas is recognized for five minutes. mr. carter: i rise to address an issue i think is very important to the patriotic men and women who fight and defend our country. representative mccollum, in good graces, asked that we restrict the military band funding by $120 million and in an attempt to help with the savings. but the congressional budget office has informed us that this reduction, this $120 million re
and a with scott miller. >> david axe was imbedded with the u.s. army in afghanistan. it is his fourth visit to the country. he spent time with the 4th airbourne, patrolling in remote areas and engaging the security situation. obama announced a plan to bring 10,000 troops home from afghanistan by the end of the year. >> it depends on where you are. my experience is in the east. i have a little experience in the south. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coaliti
war, which is iraq, afghanistan, to some extent pakistan, possibly iran. this is the battle the united states is facing. the balance of power in the region, the iran iraqi, the indo-pakistani. each one of them have destabilized over 10 years. in the air of israel relationship, barring some dramatic change in egypt over time, israel is so dominant that it creates new realities on the ground. there's a difference to what the united states really says very often. in afghanistan the united states is asking pakistan to do things that create stability, that will weaken pakistan, that potentially cratered an independent regional power in india, that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. and, of course, the invasion of iraq has destroyed the iraq power, they're forgetting nuclear weapons. iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region. if the united states is there. the united states as its policies to withdraw from iraq, the potential for iran to fill the vacuum is extremely high. that in turn changes the balance of power, orderlies the political dynamic in the
of afghanistan, its abilities to reestablish the safe haven. in other words, we in to render the heart of al qaeda and capable of launching attacks on our homeland, citizens, our allies, as well as preventing this group and its affiliates and adherents from doing so. at the same time, hopefully a kid and means to address the serious threat posed by the -- this does not require a global war. it does require a focus on specific regions, including what we might call the periphery, places like yemen, somalia, iraq -- it is another important distinguishing factor. it has looked increasingly to other groups and individuals to take a because, including the gold strike and the united states. we a specific and focus counter- terrorism and objectives. we're protecting our home and by constantly reducing our vulnerability is and not acting -- and adapting our abilities. we're the greatest al qaeda's capabilities and disrupting its operation. we're degrading the capability of al qaeda senior leadership to inspire, to nicki with, and direct the operations of its adherents from the world. we are aggressiv
actxs reports on u.s. troops in southern afghanistan. then, representative thaddeus mccotter announces his candidacy for president. >> tune in to c-span this independent state. panelists discuss if the united states can remain united. >> at the political level, we are more divided. you look at partisan polarization at any point since the civil war and reconstruction. >> then, religion, bonds, and the death penalty. later, nixon white house insiders discuss his foreign policy. this monday on c-span. for the complete schedule, go to c-span.org. >> david axe was imbedded with the u.s. army in afghanistan. it is his fourth visit to the country. he spent time with the 4th airbourne, patrolling in remote areas and engaging the security situation. obama announced a plan to bring 10,000 troops home from afghanistan by the end of the year. >> it depends on where you are. my experience is in the east. i have a little experience in the south. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have st
the corridor's hall of power. afghanistan, if we listen to president obama during the campaign and are said progressive need to be as tough and pragmatic about president obama as he is about us. he spoke about afghanistan as a good work and he needed to show because of the national security state gregoire politics till we find a way to end that the president remained captive to that. he had to show he was tough. i think what is going on is you have the ability on a number of core issues, one of them is afghanistan, corporate power is another, transpartisan majority who want a way out of afghanistan, believe corporate power is strong in this country and a president with leadership could seize that and find a way to build politics around that. thinking of president johnson, wars kill reform presidencies. and president obama, he is a reform, too ltd. but in these areas he is a reform president. it is imperative for citizens, progress of, citizens of conscience to organize more independently and find ways to drive those issues into the next election but more generally build coalitions that will
represented inside the halls corridor of power. afghanistan, you know, if we listened to president obama during the campaign, and i was one who said that,ing you know, progressives need to be tough and pragmatic about president obama as he is about us, he spoke about afghanistan as the good war, and he did that because he needed to show because of the national security state grip on our politics, until we find a way to end that, a president remains captive to a large extent. he had to show he was tough. i think now what's going on in this country is you have the ability, polls are snapshots, but on a number of core issues, afghanistan, corporate powers and others, there's majorities of people who want a way out of afghanistan, who believe corporate power is too strong in this country, and a president with leadership could seize that. it's not too late, and find a way to build politics around that. thinking of president johnson, wars kill, reform presidencies. president obama is a reform, maybe deluded, too limited, but in these areas, a reform president. it's imperative now for citizens,
rodriguez says he doesn't expect violence in afghanistan to start decreasing until next year. from the pentagon earlier today, this is 45 minutes. >> general rodriguez, it's counselor dave lapin at the pentagon. if you're ready to go, i'll introduce you and we'll get started. >> ok, dave, go ahead, thanks. >> thank you. good morning to those here, good evening in afghanistan. i'd like to welcome pack to the pentagon briefing room, army lieutenant general david rodriguez. he's commander of the international security assistance force joint command, also known as i.j.c. and also the deputy commander of the united states forces afghanistan. general rodriguez's current tour began in june, 2009, he became the first commander of the i.j.c. in october of that year. prior to that, general rodriguez was commander of regional command east for 15 months from january, 2007 to april, 2008. next week after two straight years in command and more than 40 months in after gap stan over the past 4 1/2 year, general rodriguez is ski wruled to change command and return stateside to have u.s. army forces
to debate the timing of our military drawdown in afghanistan. my belief is that the general's voice should carry the most weight. what is wrong as for the republican party to shrink from the challenges of american leadership in the world. history repeatedly warns us that in the long run, weakest and foreign policy cost us and our children much more than we will ever say in the budget -- saved in the budget line item. america has one political party devoted to decline and withdrawal it doesn't need a second one. our enemies respect and respond to strength. sometimes strength means military intervention. sometimes it means diplomatic pressure. that always means moral clarity in word and deed. that is the legacy of republican foreign policy at its best in our next republican president must carry the banner around the world. of equality and opportunity for all citizens, it remains a dream for people in the middle east and around the world. as america stands for these principles and stands with our friends and allies, the middle east will transform this moment of turbulence into a more lasting
in afghanistan and they started the ltte. the people would give the attacks in india as a counterweight to the military power. all those groups of operational connections now and the experts would be and are inclined to plan operations against the west both at home and abroad, so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal and how much would someone get a nuclear complex there's several ways. you could of the clandestine sale of materials which a.q., the father of the program for a number of years you could have a rogue officer take over the nuclear installation work you could have my scenario where the transit from the secured facilities to the front lines and the nuclear alert because that's where it's most vulnerable. so you have a combination of weapons, the country which is hostile, the security service which has ties to the jihadists and a lot of them have been indulged by the establishment and the security, and you have something that is a worry and i would suggest it was the great national security fears that we have. >> in your book you have osama bin lade
of the most powerful men in afghanistan and allegedly had ties to drug trafficking. his death could make the security situation worse in that region in a news conference with the french president. the former president said his brother's desk reflects the suffering of all afghan people. we will keep you abreast of the story as we continue with fox and friends. >> his background is to be the best because he is someone, as you mentioned, gretchen, who has ties to drug traffickers, an allegation he denied and he was on the pay roll of some of our intelligence operatives, which we have denied. it's not like he is mas. d, who was considereddy most all people to be a positive leader for afghanistan. >> he was part of the problem. in the meantime let's talk a little bit about this. well, those debt talks. you know they will meet every day, the president told us, until they figure out how to do something about that number that just keeps ticking bigger and bigger and bigger. today they meet at 3:45. once again they are in one of the conference rooms at the white house. it's interesting, before th
to afghanistan. we were out of the taliban out of power. karzai stood for free elections in 2004. al qaeda was dismantled and settled in waziristan and pakistan. this is not a nation-building exercise. this encounter terror exercise. we do not need 100,000 troops on the ground at the cost we are paying today in order to get the job done. [applause] and i am here to tell you that the future of the u.s. is not going to be determined in the prairies of afghanistan. the future of the u.s., whether you want to recognize it or not, is going to be determined by how well prepared we are to compete in a highly competitive century, and that battle is going to be waged across the ocean. as you walk off of this building, i want you to remember why we are in this race. it is about the generation behind us and the condition they will find our nation in. the debt trajectory that we are on. and number two, the reality of launching a new industrial revolution, it is within our grasp. it has happened before in our nation's history. problem-solving people can do it again. we need leadership and a game plan.
the thdrawal in afghanistan to u.s. relationships with china. the los angeles angels of anaheim has written apart from the firs family there may b no one who spends more time than donilon. as the u.s. faces economic challenges at home and rapid changes abroad with an arab spring, the white houshas made its mission to restore american prestige and influence and power around the world. i'm pleased t have tom donilon at this table for the first time welcome. >> thank you, charlie, great to be here. good to see you. >> rose: there's so much to talk about in limited time. we could spend 30 minutes just talking about your biography and your friendship with warren christopher, the clinton administration, all of that. you combine policy and politics in earlier careers and now it's the focus of the united states and its relationship with the world. how do you view the mission? because you said you wanted to restore america's credibility, its influence, its respect, and its power. >> well, i think that's exactly right, and that is our core goal at this point. we came into office in 2009 after a diffi
it comes to discussing the merits of continuing our efforts in afghanistan, the republicans clamor to defend it despite our fiscal mess. i want to remind my republican friends the situation we are in now is not new. throughout history from rome to the ottoman empire to the soviet union the over extension of military and protracted struggles in foreign countries has crippled empires. some historians have credited ronald reagan for the soviet union's collapse but what really bankrupted the soviet union was its wars, just like us, they paid a crushing price both financially and morally in afghanistan. overextending geopolitically comes at a cost over time in any nation that thinks otherwise is setting itself up to repeat the mistakes of the past. as of today, the united states has spent more than 2 1/2 times the percentage of g.d.p. on afghanistan that the -- than the soviet union spent on its g.d.p. during its nine-year war in afghanistan. public polls are clear, americans know the cost of the war in afghanistan is unsustainable and want us to withdraw as soon as possible. when it co
university professor. after this break, we will talk more politics and legislation and afghanistan with our roundtable, conn carroll and jamelle bouie. be right back. ♪ >> monday on c-span, the dali lama -- dalai lama and martin luther king, jr.'s speechwriter. they spoke about a number of topics, including the death penalty. >> the number of people who kill through violence -- are killed through violence, over 200 million. but problem not solved. i think that people lay down a seed of hatred. >> watch this discussion monday at 6:30 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> monday night on c-span, look back at president nixon's foreign policy. members of his administration and the president's son-in-law discuss topics including communism in china, invading north vietnam, and the 1967 war in the middle east. >> the discussion then in the newspapers were nixon's secret plan for peace. what was it? of course, he never talked about it. that was rockefeller pushing nixon to say something, to expose what his plan was. rockefeller did not think that nixon had a plan. he comes in after a hard day of campaigning
to former current jihadists. they help to find and the taliban to fight the russians. back in afghanistan. they fought and started the people he did the mumbai attacks in india. as a counterweight to india military power. all those groups have operational connections to each other now. the experts believe that they would be, and are inclined to plan operations against the west, both at home and abroad. so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal? how might someone need a nuclear bomb? there's several ways. you could have a rogue officer come you have a clandestine sale of materials which a.q. khan, the father of the nuclear program of pakistan before a number of years. you have a rogue officer taking over nuclear installation, or you can have my scenario where a bomb in transit from its secure facility the front lines in a nuclear, storm because that's where it's most one of the. you're the combination of weapons, a country which is hostile, a security service which has ties to jihadists. jihadists have been indulged on the establishment military and security, and
this morning. he didn't want to kill terrorists in afghanistan perhaps because he wanted to kill americans right here at home. awol soldier may have been inspired by al-qaida cleric copycat to the ft. hood massacre, they are checking into that following his arrest and confession that he wanted to, "get even" with the army allegedly plotting two attacks near the base. the suspected gunman in the original attack had direct contact with awlaki. yesterday, they announced they found jihadist literature in his hotel room. he made headlines in 2009 refusing to deploy to afghanistan. >> i don't want to get deployed because i believe i can't both deploy and be a muslim. >> abdo was facing court-martial on child pornography charges when he went awol from fort campbell, kentucky. they alerted police that he had been actly suspiciously. hasan bought weapons before his alleged shooting spree. they think he planned the attack alone and they're no longer in danger. >> we today would have been giving you a different briefing. >> the gun store clerk that tipped off police, former marine and police officer
and afghanistan. he is in baghdad this morning where he's meeting with u.s. forces as well as iraqi leaders. he says iraq has to do more to prevent insurge attacks on americans with iranian weapons. >> i would like for iraq to exert more of an effort to go after those extremists that are making use of these weapons, that if you are going, they have a responsibility to protect against that kind of attack occurring. >> all 46,000 remaining american troops are withdrawing this year under an agreement between the two countries. iraqi leaders are debating whether to request u.s. troops stay in the country beyond 2011. >>> this morning, pakistan telling america, keep your money, after the u.s. announced it's withholding $800 million in military aid. this is more evidence of the growing rift between the u.s. and pakistan. white house chief of staff william daly says it's in response to pakistan's decision to cut back on counterterrorism operations after the killing of osama bin laden. the u.s. typically gives pakistan more than $2 billion a year in security assistance. >>> u.s. joint chiefs of staff a
" reported last year by jason carroll. he's back in afghanistan with one of those soldiers, sergeant randy shorter. >> sergeant shorter was part of the surge who arrived last august. his one-year mission is nearly complete. jason is live from shirr rana in the northeastern part of afghanistan. happy fourth of july to you, nice to see you. >> and happy fourth of july to you. i'm going to bring in randy shorter right now. i have to tell you, we now have to refer to him as first sergeant randy shorter because he's since been promoted since the last time the two of us were together. let me bring you in here now. tell us about, what was it september, august, the last time i was with you guys? >> tell me what the past several months have been like? the taliban has been exerting its influence in the area. how has it been for you? >> for me and my men it's been quite busy. getting out there, getting after it. we've been steadily, you know, helping the afghan people here. we've been promoting a lot of projects, a lot of schools, getting out there every day. >> also, congratulations on that promotio
it into perspective, let's take a look at how hot it's going to be in afghanistan. it's going to be 106 in cann kandahar. take a look at this. these are the highs for iraq for today. it's going to be 108 in mosul and 110 in baghdad and 112 in basrah. remember when you're out there wearing a t-shirt, the men and women over there are in full gear. with camouflage, hard to see them. the nfl lockout appears close to an end. they will meet to discuss approving a deal that could probably bring the lockout to a close. players from 32 teams voting, same thing perhaps on thursday and then quickly start sweating in pads. the one issue that appeared to be resolved, a billion dollars put aside to the guys who made very little money and really pioneered the game. the retired players. and tiger woods is finally collecting money but not from the golf course. a former mistress is having to return most of the $10 million in hush money she gave the pro because she reportedly spoke out to tmz and she also -- she also had spoke to "celebrity rehab" where she was trying to get cured of her addiction to love. so i'm
, that's clear, isn't it? so there he was, he was making his 15th trip to afghanistan and it was while he was over at camp leatherneck that the marines asked him, okay, if there are a bunch of pentagon cuts, how is that going to affect our equipment and stuff like that. and wherever he has gone so far during this particular swing through the country of afghanistan, the troops are saying are we going to get paid? and he's saying, i don't know. just know this whatever you are owed you'll get paid eventually. you know, and this is how this works down. if we do, talking about if we go into a debt ceiling where we can't pay our bills technically which i don't agree with anyway, let's say, the president has the tablt to decide who gets paid when. clearly the debt is going to get paid first. china and saudi arabia are paid before our military, as bad as that sounds, that has to happen, so our borrowing costs don't go through the roof and then pay the military and social security, and if you dodonn tt order, give the department of education money first, it's the president's fault. it's not congre
in the attacks in afghanistan or to bring that message home, you need us i >>dave: and how big a concern is an attack in the united states on the 10th anniversary? >>guest: this is the first anniversary a sense of celebration and resolution and every member of al qaeda is going to want to spoil that. so you will have home green terrorists that will look at that date. >>dave: so all eyes on that date and that will be our tightest secured date so a difficult day to pull anything off? >>guest: it is possible but there are so many soft targets and the bar is so low for al qaeda because they have not pulled off another september 11th it does not have to be in new york city. >>dave: ryan, thank you for being here. millions of americans are locking for america but how can you separate yourself from the field? why who you know could be more important than what you know. giving them a new choice. we'll deliver better service, with thousands of new cell sites... f greater access to all the things you want, whenever you want them. it's the at&t network... and what's possible in here is almost impos
.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, hundreds of thousands have been injured. ambassador john bolton, happy independence day and thank you so much for taking the time. >> thank you. happy 4th. >> heather: it appears that new york city's budget woes are far-reaching. the city will have to shut down the swimming pools and summertime programs. david lee miller looks how the money crisis will hit the youngest residents? >> we're not just talking about new york city, a natio
had "rambo" in afghanistan, you have a war in the afghanistan and a lot of the way we describe it is about the rambos in afghanistan. obviously, gordon gekko becomes bernie madoff and all the ripoff artist on wall street. the evil guy from "tron," i'm only have joke here, kind of is mark zuckerberg. [laughter] the a-team, the idea of the private contractor you have to hire to fix your problems for you is kind of, in some ways, blackwater or at least our reliance on private contractors and how we think about private contractors. and the evil guy, cobra, in "g.i. joe," was a very clear allusion to islamic fundamentalist terrorism. what i argue in the book is that these images, these stories became powerful in the 1990 and -- 1980s and enduring because of certain structural changes that were happening in our economy. and i told nathan by e-mail that i was going to do this. i stole and used one of the cover graphics of nathan's book to sort of highlight how this happened. but an argument in this book is that things change in the 1980s in a way that made the storylines and the icono
from the middle east and afghanistan and pakistan. americans were the new gold standard and we have a generation al-qaida 2.0 and they are the new version of the digital jihadist. >> historically said terrorist are a muslim male and if you don't fit that profile you don't have to worry. in the book you say that is no longer the model. >> that's right. the american sudden al awaki. whether he is e-mailing or bloging or skyping he using technology and the facebook friend from hell. he spreads ideology to. there is a documented case was home grown terrorism since january 2009 every few weeks. >> what is a sign that a parent ought to be worried about their child recruited or sought after by the terrorist? >> common links we see is the american cleric. lookk at the cases in the united states. almost always the fingerprints of this digital jihadist . the young man who drove the car bomb not far from where we are. he was a diseeple . travel to pakistan and got his training. this event in times square was a successful attack. he drove a car in there with what he thought was a viable explosi
-- the other factor is that we are now drawing down the cost of our military efforts in afghanistan and iraq. last year we spent a little over $150 billion. this year we'll spend a little over $100 billion. and the plan is to soon be down to at least $50 billion in two or three years. so over the ten-year period there'll be about eight years at nearly $50 billion or so spent on the war instead of $150 billion. that's part of the plan that we've been operating on for a long time. $150 billion for the war is not baseline expenditure of the united states. it was never projected to continue at that level, so hopefully we could bring it below $50 billion. maybe we went get to $50 billion. i don't know. but what is the reasonable estimate? i think the house republicans and the president said it would drop to $50 billion, and that would be the baseline out there for the rest of the time. that's $1 trillion. that's $1 trillion. so you take $1 trillion out of the $2.7 trillion, you're down to $1.7 trillion. and another thing that's scored in that, since that $1 trillion in war costs is scored the way
in afghanistan and iraq and not really cutting the deficit. we're boring 40 cents on the dollar for every dollar that we spend in washington. and we cannot keep doing this. one thing i like to see is the repeal of obamacare. that alone would save us $2.5 trillion in the next 10 years. as far as the reid plan, i like to see him get it through the senate. i did not think that it would pass. host: couple we go to an independent in michigan, here is what the "new york times calls " says this morning. go ahead. caller: i called my representative yesterday and asked him to work with the president to compromise and make sure that the debt ceiling is raised over into 2013. this is destroying our economy. host: where do you see compromise? caller: th reid plan has cuts and take this off the table until 2013. i think that that makes sense. host: so you do not agree with republicans on this. caller: i do not. there is trillions of dollars being cut. let's take this and we don't want to make this something that the rest of the world is going to use against us. our dollar is worth nothing in the last 10 year
overnight. a bomb blast in eastern afghanistan leaves three nato service members dead. at this hour, the victim's nationalities are being withheld. this comes on the heels of a weekend attack that left another nato soldier dead, killed by a man dressed in an afghan army uniform. it happened when david petraeus handed over control. it shows petraeus transferring power to lieutenant general john allen. in september, petraeus will become director of the c.i.a. and another bus tour crashing. this one leaving at least two people dead. it happened about 55 miles south of rochester, new york. the bus was on its way from washington, d.c. to niagara falls when the driver lost control, veered down a grassy embankment into the woods. 35 passengers are hurt. four of them are in critical condition. early reports indicate a tire blowout might have caused that crash. and the video is incredible and horrifying at the same time. a look at what happened, a stage collapse at a cheap trick concert and it was all caught on camera. it happened during a thunderstorm at the ottawa blues fest. thousands of
every month for military operations in afghanistan alone to prop up a corrupt and incompetent karzai government. how about ending wasteful subsidies to big agriculture companies? how about asking billionaire hedge fund managers to pay the same tax rates as their secretaries? the truth is that the best way to deal with our long-term fiscal situation is to grow our economy. that means creating jobs and putting people back to work. the last election i thought was about jobs. we haven't talked about jobs at all since the new republican majority became -- came to power. that means investing in things like education and infrastructure and green technology and medical research. that's the kind of economic future the american people deserve. the boehner default plan would take us exactly in the wrong direction and urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to reject it. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california has 5 1/2 minutes remaining. the gentleman is recognized. mr. dreier: mr
of other members of congress, there were warlords from the northern alliance of afghanistan that wanted to meet with us because we were told that the administration didn't want to meet with them and after we met with them it was clear why the administration wouldn't want to. now, i was not aware and it was during the bush administration, of course, our initial actions in afghanistan, we sent in intelligence, we sent in special forces, we sent in weaponry, we equipped the northern alliance tribes who had a special personal interest in defeating the taliban. and afghanistan as a whole had seen how evil the taliban was. how much damage they could do to society as they burned paintings and books and films and totally suppressed freedom in afghanistan. they knew. these people were evil but they were afraid of them but with the united states weaponry, with our guidance and intelligence training these people defeated the taliban. what i was not aware of until we met with these folks and turns out i could have been aware, i just was not, but do you the research, you find out, the bush administr
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)

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